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12

Sep

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features George Herms.

Herms’ work is presented in a new, two-volume monograph called “George Herms: The River Book.” The book includes new pictures of Herms’ work, photographs as well as texts by both Herms and Dave Hickey. It was just published by Hamilton Press. Amazon offers it for under $60 — a 40 percent discount.

Herms is also the subject of a new exhibition presented by Fluent Collaborative and testsite in Austin, Texas. Titled "LOVE George Herms," the exhibition includes a selection of Herms’ found-object suclptures and more recent collages. It was curated by Sarah Bancroft and will be on view through October 19.

Herms came to prominence in California in the 1950s, one of a group of artists who accumulated found objects into wondrous sculptures. Herms work has been the subject of numerous retrospectives, including at the Newport Harbor Art Museum (1979) and at the Santa Monica Museum of Art (2005). Herms has been awarded three National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, the Prix de Rome from the American Academy in Rome and a Guggenheim fellowship. 

This is Herms’ Coffee Table Book with Blue Marble (1990) from the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. It’s an example of how Herms uses rust as ‘patina,’ a subject he discusses with host Tyler Green on this week’s program.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

11

Sep

slaughterhouse90210:

"Some people you just had to embrace, in some way or another, had to bite into the muscle, to remain sane in their company. You needed to grab their hand and clutch it like a downer so they would pull you into their midst. Otherwise they, walking casually down the street towards you, almost about to wave, would leap over a wall and be gone for months.” ― Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient
 

slaughterhouse90210:

"Some people you just had to embrace, in some way or another, had to bite into the muscle, to remain sane in their company. You needed to grab their hand and clutch it like a downer so they would pull you into their midst. Otherwise they, walking casually down the street towards you, almost about to wave, would leap over a wall and be gone for months.”
― Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient

 

newsweek:

On Earth Day, 1971, nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful launched what the Ad Council would later call one of the “50 greatest commercials of all time.”
Dubbed “The Crying Indian,” the one-minute PSA features a Native American man paddling down a junk-infested river, surrounded by smog, pollution, and trash; as he hauls his canoe onto the plastic-infested shore, a bag of rubbish is tossed from a car window, exploding at his feet.
The camera then pans to the Indian’s cheerless face just as a single tear rolls down his cheek.
The ad, which sought to combat pollution, was widely successful: It secured two Clio awards, incited a frenzy of community involvement, and helped reduce litter by 88% across 38 states.
Its star performer, a man who went by the name “Iron Eyes Cody,” subsequently became the “face of Native Indians,” and was honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Advertisers estimate that his face, plastered on billboards, posters, and magazine ads, has been viewed 14 billion times, easily making him the most recognizable Native American figure of the century.
But while Hollywood trumpeted Iron Eyes Cody as a “true Native American” and profited from his ubiquitous image, the man himself harbored an unspoken secret: he was 100% Italian.
The True Story of ‘The Crying Indian’

newsweek:

On Earth Day, 1971, nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful launched what the Ad Council would later call one of the “50 greatest commercials of all time.”

Dubbed “The Crying Indian,” the one-minute PSA features a Native American man paddling down a junk-infested river, surrounded by smog, pollution, and trash; as he hauls his canoe onto the plastic-infested shore, a bag of rubbish is tossed from a car window, exploding at his feet.

The camera then pans to the Indian’s cheerless face just as a single tear rolls down his cheek.

The ad, which sought to combat pollution, was widely successful: It secured two Clio awards, incited a frenzy of community involvement, and helped reduce litter by 88% across 38 states.

Its star performer, a man who went by the name “Iron Eyes Cody,” subsequently became the “face of Native Indians,” and was honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Advertisers estimate that his face, plastered on billboards, posters, and magazine ads, has been viewed 14 billion times, easily making him the most recognizable Native American figure of the century.

But while Hollywood trumpeted Iron Eyes Cody as a “true Native American” and profited from his ubiquitous image, the man himself harbored an unspoken secret: he was 100% Italian.

The True Story of ‘The Crying Indian’

10

Sep

nprfreshair:

David Bianculli says the new 14-hour PBS documentary series The Roosevelts: An Intimate History  is Ken Burns' best yet:

"Each of these Roosevelts, if studied individually, would be fascinating. But looking at them together like this is a revelation – a sort of storytelling synergy, where the whole ends up being even more valuable than the sum of its parts."

Photo: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt with their children in Washington, DC, June 12, 1919. (credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library, Hyde Park, NY)

nprfreshair:

David Bianculli says the new 14-hour PBS documentary series The Roosevelts: An Intimate History  is Ken Burns' best yet:

"Each of these Roosevelts, if studied individually, would be fascinating. But looking at them together like this is a revelation – a sort of storytelling synergy, where the whole ends up being even more valuable than the sum of its parts."

Photo: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt with their children in Washington, DC, June 12, 1919. (credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library, Hyde Park, NY)

5 Great Reads about the Senses

tetw:

image


Mixed Feelings by Sunny Bains - How researchers and technology can hack our senses to create completely new ways of experiencing the world

The Blind Man Who Learned To See by Michael Finkel - The fascinating story of a man who is helping blind people to see using echolocation

Master of illusion by Ed Yong - How a neuroscientist from Stockholm can use mannequins, rubber arms and virtual reality to transport you outside your own body

Sense and Sensitivity by Andrea Bartz - Is it possible that some people’s senses are more acute than others, and that are our attitudes towards sensitivity are misguided?

The Possibilian by Burkhard Bilger - How the subtlest shift in perception can create whole a new way of seeing the world

09

Sep

housingworksbookstore:

We’re celebrating this day in literary history in the window! Stop by Crosby Street for fun facts like today, September 9, 1910, Alice B. Toklas moved in with Gertrude Stein.

mymodernmet:

In response to a number of clients seeking options for living on extreme coastal plots, Australian prefab architecture firm Modscape created the Cliff House, a design concept for a modular, vertical home that extends precariously from the side of a cliff.

mymodernmet:

For her series Landscape Multiple, Helsinki-based artist Caroline Slotte carves and sands through stacked dinner plates to create porcelain pieces that feature delightfully surprising three-dimensional scenes.

mymodernmet:

Canadian artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her 2-year-old daughter Eve to produce vibrant paintings. For each piece, the young girl first doodles on a page with black ink. Oosterman then chats with her daughter as she paints to get a sense of the ideas behind the lines.

08

Sep

coverspy:

After our own hearts.
(via Penguin Random House)

coverspy:

After our own hearts.

(via Penguin Random House)